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Monthly Archives: March 2013

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Christina Skreiberg is a freelance feature journalist, photographer, DJ and designer from Norway.  I met Christina in London about 6-7 years ago (wow can’t believe it’s been so long!).  During her four years in London, she gained a degree in Journalism from City University London and launched the east London magazine “ditched” which got her a nomination for The Guardian Student Media Award for her work as editor and publisher.  Now living in Oslo, Christina has been pursuing her dream of working as a freelance journalist, a career which has led her to be involved in various different projects and travel all over the world writing about a range of topics that she is passionate about, some of which include sociocultural issues, art and travel. For the past year she has helped launch as well as being the commissioning editor for a new Norwegian newspaper called Aftenposten Junior. What’s so cool about this is, it’s a newspaper especially for kids (and the first of its kind in Norway), giving children a voice on issues that are important to them:

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Now ready to move on from this valuable learning experience, Christina is set to continue with her freelance work, photography and making interesting accessories.  I feel so lucky to know such an amazing and wonderful person who has such a creative imagination and love of the world.  Here is a range of Christina’s features, photography and accessories:

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Find out more about Christina and all the wonderful things she’s up to on her blog: http://christinaskreiberg.blogspot.co.uk and website: http://www.christinaskreiberg.com

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This is Orion.  He lives in California and is really into his wine, so much so that he is currently in the process of producing his own wine label.  He sent me this photo yesterday – bottling is done, now onto the selling!  If you’re anywhere around the California area and if you’re into red wine look out for Dilecta (it won’t be in shops until around August but remember you heard it here first!)

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As I much as I try not to, I sometimes judge a book, or in this case a DVD by its cover.  I’m quite particular about what kind of films I watch and a film about violence and brutality on the streets of Paris didn’t particularly appeal to me.  However, yesterday I was going through all the DVDs I have and realised that I hadn’t watched this particular one.  For some reason, I’d put off watching this film because I had already put the idea into my head that perhaps it ‘wasn’t my kind of film’.  But I took the plunge and decided to watch La Haine (Hate) directed by Mathieu Kassovitz.  It tells the story of three youths; Hubert, Said and Vince, who after witnessing their friend being brutally beaten up by the police, vow to take revenge if he dies.  Their estate becomes a battleground in the space of 24 hours, in which the police and the boys on the estate see both sides as enemies.

What would have made this film even better is if the three boys didn’t live up to their stereotypical roles, which to some extent they didn’t- inside the care-free angry exterior were three boys who were fearless yet at the same time scared and showed love and respect yet simultaneously demonstrated so much hate (for the police).

 From a fashion perspective, the mix of New York ‘street’ style and classic 90s worked really well mainly due to the fact that it was genuine and actually shot in the 90s (and in black and white) the camera is clever yet conveyed in such an unpretentious way.  All three main actors were brilliant in their portrayals and for me, the film really highlighted the importance of friendship and loyalty.  La Haine raises serious issues (drugs, racism, crime, deprivation) but in such a humourous way.  There are so many funny moments that make you realise that whatever you’re going through there’s always room for laughter. I absolutely loved this film and would definitely recommend it.  So, the moral for today (and everyday for that matter) is:  don’t judge a DVD or a book or a person or anything else by how it/they looks because you may well be wrong (like I was)! 

Le monde est à vous

ImageMomaya Press’s short story competition is open to writers of any nationality writing in English and offers the opportunity for winners to be published in the momaya annual review 2013

Every year there is a different them and this year the theme is “Music”.  While entries for the short story competition may be on any topic, the review gets its cohesion from stories and artwork focusing on our central theme, interspersed amongst the contest winners’ stories. To celebrate 10 years of Momaya Press, the deadline has now been extended to the 15th May, so there’s still time to get writing!

For inspiration or to find out more go on to:

http://www.momayapress.com

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I first saw this documentary about two years ago and watched it again yesterday and felt compelled to write this piece.  The main purpose of the documentary is to question the fact that when there is so much wealth in the world (and so many precious resources within developing countries), why does poverty still exist?  Although this may seem like a simple question that has a simple answer, the The End of Poverty illustrates the complex issues involved with poverty.  The first, being from a historical context: the consequences of military conquests by Spain and Portugal, the transatlantic slave trade and colonialism are all considered as explicit reasons as to why the majority of people in countries like Asia, Africa and Latin America still live in poverty. Although having said this, I would like to stress my own personal frustration at the media’s constant portrayal of Africa as a helpless continent that constantly relies on aid from the West to keep the people of Africa going.  This is not the case. The decisions and actions that have been carefully established and maintained since the years of colonialism have left devastating effects on the countries that were stripped of their land, access to natural resources, unfair trade, debt repayment, unjust taxes on labour and consumption and tax evasion.  The system of poverty was and still is kept alive by free market policies and structural adjustment programmes, which are controlled by manipulative financial institutions and multinational corporations.  Although the film dwelled a lot on the historical reasons of poverty, it also highlighted the predominant economic system, which essentially requires cheap labour and cheap resources from the South in order to finance the North’s expensive lifestyle.  Author Susan George, who featured in the documentary even went as far as to suggest that sub-Saharan Africa pays $ 25, 000 every minute to Northern creditors and in doing so are actually financing the West making Britain and America and other developed countries richer and Africa and Asia poorer.  In other words, the West has exploited fellow human beings on this Earth so much so, that 20% of the planet’s population uses 80% of its resources and consumes more than the planet can regenerate.

Philippe Diaz’s documentary is a very truthful and thought-provoking piece of work that must be seen by everybody who has an interest in global issues and/or history.  I like to dwell on the positive things that developing countries have achieved however this documentary is definitely worth watching. It is this kind of cultural intervention that still gives hope that more extreme measures can be taken to reduce and eventually eradicate this system and business of poverty that does not benefit the people and countries that it really should.

 For more information visit:

 www.theendofpoverty.com

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